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Writer-painter Dinesh Rai dies of prolonged illness in Bhopal

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BHOPAL: Dinesh Rai, author, painter and playwright died at his residence here Monday morning. He was 81 years old. Rai, who had been ill for many years, leaves behind his wife and two daughters.

A man of many talents, Rai had also written scripts for a few films, including “Wafa” and “Kalka”. He had also written the scripts for numerous television shows and radio plays. Rai, who was a lawyer by profession, was a close friend of poet and lyricist Javed Akhtar and film actor Rajeev Verma.

In fact, Rajeev Verma claimed that Rai was a negro for Javed Akhtar. Verma said that Rai was an excellent painter and writer. “He was like my older brother,” he said, adding that he and Shyam Munshi were like family.

Rai had written the drama adaptation of Munshi Premchand’s famous novel “Godan”, which was staged at Ravindra Bhawan about 40 years ago. “I performed in the play as well as in its production crew,” said Verma.

It was the first play to be performed outdoors in the city on a large scale, said Urdu playwright Rafi Shabbir.

Mumbai-based writer and director Rumi Jafferi said he first met Rai in 1986 in Mumbai. “At that time, he was moving to Bhopal and he gave me his rented accommodation, as well as the furniture and accessories,” he said.

An exhibition of his paintings was held at the Jehangir Art Gallery in Mumbai. “Javed Akhtar and I went to see the exhibit. We wanted to buy one of his paintings but instead he asked us to buy the works of young painters from MP. “Mine, I will give it to you,” he told us, ”Jafri said.

According to Jafferi, Rai’s disappearance is a great loss for Bhopal. “He was a very talented person. But he was not ambitious, ”he said. Jafferi said that when Javed Akhtar visited Rai’s residence in Bhopal, he was surprised to see that three rooms in the house were full of books.

Artist Hamidullah Khan ‘Mamu’ said Rai was like a loving and loving head of the family to him. Mamu said that Rai was very interested in the annual Iftekhar Natya Samaroh and offered valuable advice and guidance. “The city has lost three beautiful people in the recent past – Shyam Munshi, Manzoor Ahtesham and now Dinesh Rai,” Mamu said.

Actor and theater director Dinesh Nair has said that Rai is an idealist. “He left the legal profession because he didn’t want to stand up for people who had done something wrong,” Nair said. Rai was in love with his ancestral home and had it rebuilt. In the meantime, he had moved into rental accommodation but died before his house was ready.

“Rai came from an illustrious family of freedom fighters,” journalist LS Herdenia said, paying tribute to the writer.

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Posted on: Monday, September 13, 2021, 10:41 p.m. IST


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Cariboo scenes inspire painter – 100 Mile House Free Press

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Cameron Bird had to make the difficult choice of upscaling or painting it.

The Lac La Hache artist chose the latter, but his former career as a pack horse guide at Chilcotin Holidays Guest Ranch is a great source of inspiration for his works of art.

“Working up there is one of the biggest inspirations for what I do. I paint a lot of mountain and high mountain scenes so as you ride your horse you sit there slowly going through the environment so I was able to study everything, ”Bird said. “It gave me the confidence to paint. Just like a writer. They say “write down what you know” and I have learned over the years to paint what I know. “

Bird, 49, grew up in the Lower Mainland, but had developed a love for the ancient history of Cariboo ranching and horses. After learning to shoe a horse, he decided to work with them. He took a guide course at Chilcotin before finding a job at Chilcotin Holidays Guest Ranch. It was there that he met his wife Amanda.

As a pack horse guide, Bird said he liked the physicality of the guiding and the wide range of jobs, which included hauling logs, taking people on pack trips, and observing. big game. The demanding remote work, however, made it difficult to paint and deliver his work to galleries. Eventually, he chose to hang up his saddle to pick up his brush full time.

“I realized that in order to really do it full time, I just had to take the leap. There wasn’t really a ‘right time’ so I did and have been painting full time since 2000, ”Bird said.

Becoming a professional was something Bird dreamed of since he was a child, following in his father’s artistic footsteps. He started selling his detailed realistic watercolors in high school in 1989.

That started to change when he met his mentor, Kevin C. Smith, with whom he studied for a decade. Smith encouraged Bird to start using oil paints and develop his own unique style, which has evolved a lot over the past 30 years.

“These days I don’t even really think of a pretty picture, I think of powerful colors and interlocking shapes,” Bird said. “I think it’s a natural evolution just to paint everyday.”

To create a piece, Bird scours her sketchbooks for inspiration. He has several in his studio with detailed notes on the setting and location of the sketches. From there, he does a study on a wooden board where he captures the basic energy and colors of the final product.

Once the study was completed, using custom canvases made in Kelowna, Bird began painting his impressionistic depictions of the landscapes and landmarks of Cariboo. He switched to this almost abstract style to better represent the power of the images he sees in his mind.

“My style, one brushstroke can say more than 50 brushstrokes. I love the power in my paintings and a lot of people love the stronger paints on their walls and the more vivid colors, ”said Bird. “Today I have the chance to push him.”

Bird uses a single brush for each painting and uses sign painting skills learned at the British Columbia Institute of Technology. Learning to hold a brush gently and load it correctly has been the key to its success.

His large paintings can go up to $ 10,000 and are sold in galleries from Banff to Quebec. On the business side, he credits Amanda’s support and organizational skills to keeping what he does profitable.

Despite the fact that they could live anywhere, Bird said they chose to move to Lac La Hache to raise their family. He loves the “dry country” of the Cariboo and continues to draw inspiration from its landscapes. He typically produces 120 paintings a year and estimates that he made 5,000 in his lifetime. Although being a professional artist is risky, he says it’s a lifestyle he enjoys living.

” I do not get enough. When we go on vacation, if I want to relax, I usually have to go to places that I wouldn’t paint. Mexico, New Zealand or London, I can just relax, I was not inspired to paint. When I’m in Jasper, however, I’m like ‘oh this is a painting, this is a painting’. I am inspired all the time.


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A young painter from Bogura dedicates a unique art book to Bangabandhu

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Photo: Courtesy

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Photo: Courtesy

The young painter Tariqul Islam portrays his deep respect and admiration for the Father of the Nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, through his works of art.

Since childhood, he loved to draw pictures of Bangabandhu and write about it, with information from various books and internet sources. Recently, he made a book of paintings which testifies to his love for Bangabandhu.

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After three months of effort, he created a 410-page, one-inch-long book of 250 paintings, focusing on childhood, adolescence and the political life of Bangabandhu.

There are 35 pencil drawings and 215 watercolors in the book, which also contains pencil sketches of the four national rulers, seven Birshreshthas, glimpses of the linguistic movement, the historic Bangabadhu speech of March 7, the imprisoned life of Bangabandhu, the Bangladesh Liberation War and our celebration of the victory and brutal massacre of Bangabandhu and his family on August 15th.

Tariqul Islam during labor.

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Tariqul Islam during labor.

Besides the paintings, the book also describes the life of Bangabandhu from 1920 to August 15, 1975, in chronological order. Work is underway to add 90 more pages. There will be 90 more watercolors of Bangabandhu and members of his family.

Originally from the Berer Bari village of the upazila Dhunat of Bogura, Tariqul studied at the Bogra Art College.

He took his first painting lessons from his older brother Tajmilur Rahman, who has a store called “Taj Art” in Bagbari, Gabtoli.

There have been many exhibitions of paintings by Tariqul so far. His works have won numerous awards. In 2019, an exhibition of paintings was held at the Shilpakala Academy in Dhaka, which was attended by artists from 17 different countries. A number of his paintings were exhibited at the event. Apart from this, Tariqul’s paintings have also been exhibited at the Dhanmondi Art Gallery. He attended the Bangabandhu Art Camp in Mymensingh last year. He has also participated in exhibitions in Kathmandu, Myanmar and India.

“On the occasion of the centenary of Bangabandhu’s birth, I wanted to create a record in the Guinness Book of Records by drawing a living 150-foot-long portrait of him. But it would have taken a lakh taka to draw the painting. on canvas, and to exhibit it. I turned to a lot to fundraise, but no one cooperated with me. Although it disappointed me, I did not give up, “he said. added.

Ummey Habiba, acting director of Bogra Art College, said Tariqul’s efforts were undoubtedly laudable.


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Cariboo scenes inspire painter – BC Local News

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Cameron Bird had to make the difficult choice of upscaling or painting it.

The Lac La Hache artist chose the latter, but his former career as a pack horse guide at Chilcotin Holidays Guest Ranch is a great source of inspiration for his works of art.

“Working up there is one of the biggest inspirations for what I do. I paint a lot of mountain and high mountain scenes so as you ride your horse you sit there slowly going through the environment so I got to study everything, ”Bird said. “It gave me the confidence to paint. Just like a writer. They say “write down what you know” and I have learned over the years to paint what I know. “

Bird, 49, grew up in the Lower Mainland, but had developed a love for the ancient history of Cariboo ranching and horses. After learning to shoe a horse, he decided to work with them. He took a guide course at Chilcotin before finding a job at Chilcotin Holidays Guest Ranch. It was there that he met his wife Amanda.

As a pack horse guide, Bird said he liked the physicality of the guiding and the wide range of jobs, which included hauling logs, taking people on pack trips, and observing. big game. The demanding remote work, however, made it difficult to paint and deliver his work to galleries. Eventually, he chose to hang up his saddle to pick up his brush full time.

“I realized that in order to really do it full time, I just had to take the leap. There wasn’t really a ‘right time’ so I did and have been painting full time since 2000, ”Bird said.

Becoming a professional was something Bird dreamed of since he was a child, following in his father’s artistic footsteps. He started selling his detailed realistic watercolors in high school in 1989.

That started to change when he met his mentor, Kevin C. Smith, with whom he studied for a decade. Smith encouraged Bird to start using oil paints and develop his own unique style, which has evolved a lot over the past 30 years.

“These days I don’t even really think of a pretty picture, I think of powerful colors and interlocking shapes,” Bird said. “I think it’s a natural evolution just to paint everyday.”

To create a piece, Bird scours her sketchbooks for inspiration. He has several in his studio with detailed notes on the setting and location of the sketches. From there, he does a study on a wooden board where he captures the basic energy and colors of the final product.

Once the study was completed, using custom canvases made in Kelowna, Bird began painting his impressionistic depictions of the landscapes and landmarks of Cariboo. He switched to this almost abstract style to better represent the power of the images he sees in his mind.

“My style, one brushstroke can say more than 50 brushstrokes. I love the power in my paintings and a lot of people love the stronger paints on their walls and the more vivid colors, ”said Bird. “Today I have the chance to push him.”

Bird uses a single brush for each painting and uses sign painting skills learned at the British Columbia Institute of Technology. Learning to hold a brush gently and load it correctly has been the key to its success.

His large paintings can go up to $ 10,000 and are sold in galleries from Banff to Quebec. On the business side, he credits Amanda’s support and organizational skills to keeping what he does profitable.

Despite the fact that they could live anywhere, Bird said they chose to move to Lac La Hache to raise their family. He loves the “dry country” of the Cariboo and continues to draw inspiration from its landscapes. He typically produces 120 paintings a year and estimates that he made 5,000 in his lifetime. Although being a professional artist is risky, he says it’s a lifestyle he enjoys living.

” I do not get enough. When we go on vacation, if I want to relax, I usually have to go to places that I wouldn’t paint. Mexico, New Zealand or London, I can just relax, I was not inspired to paint. When I’m in Jasper, however, I’m like ‘oh this is a painting, this is a painting’. I am inspired all the time.


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100 Mile House Free Press

An untitled painting of a mountain by Cameron Bird. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

While he prefers landscapes, Cameron Bird sometimes likes to paint large game such as moose. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

A Cariboo log cabin in the winter by Cameron Bird. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

Cameron Bird works on a study painting before working on a large canvas for the finished work. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

Cameron Bird is leafing through one of his many sketchbooks. Most of Bird’s paintings start out as sketches and notes in these books before being turned into works of art. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

A British Columbia Vineyard by Cameron Bird. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

Although he specializes in painting mountains, Cameron Bird will occasionally paint West Coast inspired images like this canoe. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

A painting of a bear by Cameron Bird. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)



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The 1950s Pinay painter is the star of today’s auctions

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His “Tinapa sellers” sold for 84 million euros in February, by far the biggest source of money in this big auction which opened the year. Four months later, his “Women with Baskets, Fish and Crab” fetched 52.6 million pesos at the spectacular mid-year auction, overtaking a Vicente Manansala as well as a Fernando Amorsolo who, as “Women with Baskets” depict scenes from the Filipino market.

The “egg sellers” of Anita Magsaysay Ho

While another painting by Anita Magsaysay-Ho takes center stage this weekend at the Leon Gallery’s September auction, an image titled “Egg Vendors” made in the tempera medium at the artist’s favorite egg, with a starting price of 7 million pesos, the question arises: How do this woman’s paintings attract collectors today? Or in other words, how did a 1950s artist become the sensation of the 2021 auction?

For Jaime Ponce de Leon, director of the Leon Gallery, the lady’s accomplishments, her stature in Manila society and the limited works she left behind are the reasons why an Anita remains highly desirable almost a decade later. his passing and more than half a century after the defining years of his career.

“She didn’t paint much and only painted for her close circle of friends,” says Ponce de Leon, the force behind the country’s leading auction house. “Thus, his pieces have above all a cachet, because his circle belongs to the highest echelons of Manila. The provenances are all genealogical and this is already an absolute bonus in auction jargon.

Anita Magsaysay Ho's
“Women with Baskets, Fish and Crab” by Anita Magsaysay Ho

When we think of Anita Magsaysay-Ho, we think of her women wearing bandanas in rural areas happily doing everyday things – images inspired by the summer vacation she spent in her native Zambales. She has created iconic images of women making even the most ordinary tasks extraordinary. Her success puts her in the spotlight and equals the troupe of neo-realists and modernists, almost all of them male except Nena Saguil and Lyd Arguilla.

Daughter of an engineer named Ambrosio Magsaysay, brother of Philippine President Ramon Magsaysay, Anita studied at the UP School of Fine Arts where she was trained by Fernando Amorsolo and Fabian Dela Rosa, pillars of Filipino art. Later, while enrolled in the UP School of Design, Anita would have the privilege of having Victorio Edades as one of her instructors.

Having the means to continue her studies abroad, the young artist left for the United States in the 1930s and took oil painting classes at Cranbrook Academy in Michigan, and drawing classes at the Art Student’s League of New York.

She was the first woman to win the grand prize of the prestigious Art Association of the Philippines (AAP) competition in 1952. Looking at auctions for her paintings these days, it’s been compared to watching a Wimbledon match with its fast, non-stop volleys, fighting over the artist’s work isn’t exactly a recent occurrence. His winning AAP ’52 entry, “The Cooks,” quickly sparked a high-profile contest to own it as influential newspaper columnists and wealthy collectors vied for this treasure, even resorting to grappling in the press for it. privilege.

Robert Ho and Anita Magsaysay-Ho
Anita with her husband Robert Ho.

A few years later, Anita would be even more firmly established. In May 1956, The Sunday Times Magazine – one of the most widely read newspapers in the Philippines with a circulation of 1 million copies per day – called her “The Greatest Woman Painter in the Country Today” in an article titled “Mrs. The women of Ho.

Anita’s market paintings would then be justifiably famous. The Sunday Times continued to speak eloquently of the artist, citing famous American writer Agnes Newton Keith, in her book “Barefoot in the Palace” on post-war Filipino life, saying: “(His) market women are thin, pointed, skinny, talkative. They are both cunning and generous, both skeptical and believing. (Anita is) sorry for them because she knows she doesn’t have to be. her gods were wealth and sweetness of life, she would paint pathos and weakness on those faces. Instead, (she) put mysticism, strength, love and zest for life.

Anita married Robert Ho in 1947 and gave birth “in quick succession” to five children, one of whom would become the figure of the company and the fierce businesswoman Doris Ho, now President and CEO of the Magsaysay Group of Companies. The Hos “have lived in over 30 homes in more than six countries over a period of 50 years,” a story tells of Tatler in the Philippines. They would settle in Hong Kong for a while where the couple would host dinner parties for select friends from Manila, as longtime boyfriend Charito Panganiban-Melchor and daughter Doris friend Monique Villonco recall.

Those who talk about the allure of an Anita painting spring from her aura of serenity, her sense of humor and the glow that seems to emanate from her women who happily indulge in the day’s toil. “I think it’s so beautiful because it has a magical side to it,” says chef Margarita Forés of ‘Egg Vendors’. “I love the warmth of it.”

Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan
Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan where Anita studied before the war. Image courtesy of Galerie Léon

Having been painted during the country’s post-war years, Anita’s works also embody this spirit of timeless hope, to move forward no matter the odds. And maybe that’s why his paintings continue to resonate. Was there ever a time when this country needed more hope?

With the obvious clamor for his works, one must ask the question: are there still Anitas waiting for their moment at auction? “Definitely,” says Jaime Ponce de Leon. “There are still some in Anita’s small circle of friends. We should see a small appearance at auction with the dissolution of the large estates. But for egg distempers, “egg sellers” might be among the last to hit the market. They are extremely few. ”

[Photos courtesy of Leon Gallery]


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Deathbed of a writer Portrait of Francis Bacon

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In an email exchange, Murphy described the development of the stage production as a collaborative effort. “Max and Enda had a particularly strong understanding, which guided Enda’s adaptation of the book,” he said. “And Max was extremely generous and invaluable with his work.”

The adaptation retained much of Porter’s signature prose style, which Murphy said was well suited to the stage. “Words are absolutely beautiful to say,” he said. “Like all good writing, the more you say them, the more they reveal.”

Porter’s second outing, “Lanny,” shares a lot with Porter’s debut. Both novels are about loss, told through multiple perspectives of a single family, and feature an ageless and omnipotent observant presence. This time, instead of a crow, we are introduced to Dead Papa Toothwort, a mythical creature of the woods who hides in the shadows, watching over the drama.

Like the jerky rhythm of the Raven-starring chapters, Dead Papa Toothwort’s voice is also frenzied, with its narration interrupted by wayward digressions. These interruptions are expressed by an irregular composition, with words that crisscross and meander on the page.

These chaotic sections echo the content of Porter’s notebooks, where ideas for his novels are formed. Each book is filled with layouts of scribbled pieces, scribbled characters, scribbled phrases, and random blocks of text. While developing “The Death of Francis Bacon,” he said, he sketched in his notebooks while studying reproductions of the painter’s work.

“For three months,” he said, “I did nothing other than look at pictures of Bacon every day.”


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MAG welcomes Albertan painter David More to celebrate his work

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MAG Executive Director Lorna Johnson says MAG staff are so proud of this publication.

“It was a pleasure working with Dave, Mary-Beth and the University of Calgary Press to realize our vision for a publication that would reflect Dave’s work and celebrate his generous donation of works to MAG. It is an important step in the documentation of the art history of central Alberta.

More himself says being the subject of a book is truly a privilege, and says it allows him to share the vision he and his wife Yvette have on a much larger world.

“Equally important, this book brings the Red Deer Museum + Art Gallery to the international stage where it deserves to be. Lorna Johnson and her formidable team raised the profile of Red Deer MAG to unimaginable heights during her tenure. Working with charming author Mary-Beth Laviolette and the eminent University of Calgary Press over the past year has provided us with a most memorable journey.

David More and his wife Yvette Brideau donated 200 of his paintings and drawings to the Red Deer Museum + Art Gallery in 2019. In the same year, to recognize Dave’s generous donation, MAG organized a retrospective exhibition of his work that was organized and organized by independent curator Mary-Beth Laviolette. As an extension of her research and to celebrate Dave’s artistic achievements, Mary-Beth also wrote The largest garden. Published by University of Calgary Press, The largest garden beautifully examines the myriad subjects that have captured Dave’s attention and imagination over the years, and reflects the evolution of his artistic practice.

About David Plus

David More is one of the outstanding painters of Western Canada. Based in the rural hamlet of Benalto, near Red Deer, Alta., He is part of a generation of landscape artists who emerged in the 1970s to bring beauty out of the ordinary and challenge the expected with action. daring creation.

Throughout his career, More returned to the garden as a deeply functional but ritualistic space of human effort. The garden is a place of shelter and sanctuary, of color and fragrance, of order and of wild nature. The garden is a private space, carefully maintained and planted, observed in the open air or through the living room window. The garden is a public space, a park where people come together to let their nature flourish. The garden is the world, the nature that sustains and surrounds us, the environment in which we all live, and all have a responsibility to cultivate and care for.

About the Author

Mary-Beth Laviolette is a freelance curator and writer with 40 years of visual arts practice. She is the author of A Chronicle of Albertan Art and A delicate art: artists, wild flowers and plants native to the West. She has curated exhibitions for the Art Gallery of Alberta, the Glenbow Museum in Calgary, the Whyte Museum, and more. Mary-Beth is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Alberta Centennial Medal and Artist in the Spotlight.


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Jeanne McCartin’s sculptures presented in the Provincetown exhibition

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Denise J. Wheeler

Provincetown, at the tip of Cape Cod, is an oasis of dunes, glitter and art. It’s a beach lover’s paradise, a playground for the LGBTQ community, and home to one of America’s oldest artistic colonies. There are scenic views everywhere, be it the camp / vamp trail known as Commercial Street, or the curving tidal pool. While many come to P-town to see or be seen, Portsmouth sculptor Jeanné McCartin has come for a variation on this. She is there to see her art be seen.

McCartin and painter and gallery owner Steve Bowersock are the artists featured in “Trippin ‘: A Surreal, Fantastical, and Engageing Journey Into Two Very Peculiar Minds”. The exhibit opened to a lively crowd at the Bowersock Art Gallery in Provincetown on Friday August 20 and ran through September 2.

McCartin is widely known throughout the coast as an art writer and theater critic. She has also been an artist for over five decades – although she does not feel comfortable calling herself that.

“I’m finally ready to declare that I’m an artist,” she said the morning “Trippin ‘” opened. “It’s part of my evolution.

McCartin’s work has been featured in numerous art exhibitions over the years. For decades, she created original sculpted masks that were often as much social commentary as striking works of art. The elements of mask making continue to play a major role in his latest 3 and 4 dimensional pieces.

"Jellyfish, Warrior, Survivor" by artist Jeanné McCartin, who recently presented his works in an exhibition at the Bowersock Gallery in Provincetown, Massachusetts.

McCartin uses several cellulose and polymer pastes to create narrative sculptures – images of women – alternately empowered, angry, or vulnerable – and children enshrined in the wonders of youth.

The Provincetown Independent describes his work as “raw and fascinating”, claiming that some have “a puppet quality and a Tim Burton air”.

Gallerist Bowersock describes McCartin’s sculptures as “deeply relevant and highly collectable”.

“I do two things with my art,” says McCartin. “I create fantastic pieces featuring children. They represent things like Halloween fun, conquering the spooky monster under the bed, or kids making pirate ships out of cardboard boxes. The themes are the imagination and the experience of exploring and discovering life.

"Troubled Water" by artist Jeanné McCartin

With the dynamism and color of a circus palette, these pieces have a storybook aesthetic and innocence that both charms and delights the spectators, launching them into whimsical flights.

Then there are his works which speak of the human condition, which make the pain palpable and real.

Influenced by German artist Käthe Kollwitz, whose WWII works illustrate the effects of poverty, hunger and war on the working class, McCartin makes no effort to show his torment.

“Käthe’s work may tear your heart, but it makes our human condition elegant,” says McCartin. “We want to take the pain out of life, but it’s really part of life. Behind every fight, in this ultimate fight to overcome pain, there is human perseverance. Whenever we overcome adversity, we honor life. I want to show it in my work.

Artist Jeanne McCartin, left, and painter and gallery owner Steve Bowersock are the artists featured in

People are reacting. Earlier this summer, McCartin sent Bowersock a 3D sculpture of a snake-haired woman, hunched over fragments of a warrior, fists clenched, screaming in fury. Called “Medusa,” the room exuded pure rage. Bowersock, known for exhibiting innovative and eclectic works, placed it in his gallery window.

It sold out within days.

“Jeanné is one of those artists who are not mainstream. It’s distinct, ”says Bowersock. “It is highly collectable and skilled. When you come across his work, you connect to it immediately.

Bowersock, whose surreal and dreamlike oil paintings make up the other half of the ‘Trippin’ ‘exhibition, has been friends with McCartin for more than two decades, having bonded through a shared love of symbolism and storytelling. .

"Slide sliding away" by artist Jeanné McCartin

For “Trippin ‘,” they challenged themselves to use the difficult COVID-19 time to delve deeper into personal and cultural issues.

“It helped that Jeanne and I were in constant contact throughout, sharing both the process and the pain,” Bowersock says. “We talked about making a concerted effort not to edit what was said, and just push the new techniques to the limit.”

When he saw McCartin’s results this summer, he knew she had done just that.

“When I first met Jeanné, you could see his theatrical side in his work. Since then, she has taken that and turned in on herself, ”he says. “The stories are deeper and more relevant to our world. She is one of those artists whose work will always be relevant today.

"Oldest stories, oldest fears" by artist Jeanné McCartin

That McCartin sees herself as an artist only now may seem mind-boggling to some, and quite understandable to any woman who has crossed that tightrope in balancing career, creativity, and caring with her evolving identity.

“It took so long because of my family’s attitude, cultural attitudes and probably gender factors,” says McCartin. “In our culture, art is considered a hobby. As my mother used to say, I was the “artistic handyman”. She didn’t call me an artist until I was in my 50s.

McCartin discussed this dynamic with her friend and fellow female artist Christopher Gowell, founding executive director of the Sanctuary Arts School of Arts in Eliot, Maine.

Before the opening of “Trippin ‘,” Gowell wrote this as a tribute to McCartin, “As aging women, we are invisible, neglected, left on our own, just hoping to survive an unjust society. As women. creative, we are demeaned… Our hard work is seen as a game – not serious, not part of the patriarchal systems of galleries and museums, but diminished because we use “tricky” materials such as papier mache or work in a ‘decorative object’ ‘or narrative tradition. “

For

Don’t make the mistake, Gowell says, of downplaying McCartin’s art. He says “which is usually not said, that we are fearful, anxious, sad, angry – all in equal measure.”

McCartin says that tapping into deeply intimate ground and channeling it into his art strengthened his commitment to it.

“The more I made honest statements to myself through my art, the more I got involved. Art has become more passionate and necessary – it motivates me completely now.

Changing the way she prioritizes her time to create has also helped her see herself as an artist.

"Brittle" by artist Jeanné McCartin

“I increased the level of my personal commitment to making art,” she says. “It means I’m spending more time on it. Art isn’t the last thing I spend time on, it’s the first thing.

At the opening of the exhibition, McCartin spoke with guests and discussed his work. A guest said she was afraid to buy a sculpture of a person turning away from the peril of life or death because it would “rip off the character’s head.”

“She got it,” McCartin laughs. “She recognized the story behind the coin.”

“People have said great things,” she added. “More importantly, they seemed to capture the themes of the plays – which is very important to a storyteller.”

For more information on ‘Trippin’, A Surreal, Fantastical, and Engaging Journey Into Two, Very Peculiar Minds’, at the Bowersock Gallery, 373 Commercial St., Provincetown, Massachusetts, visit https://bowersockgallery.com/.

Editor’s Note: Jeanné McCartin is the theater critic for the Seacoast Media Group and writes his weekly column Gossip.


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Felicia Pride, writer and director of “Really Love,” on How Wash, DC inspired the love story

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* Kofi Siriboe and Yootha Wong-Loi-Sing are the stars of the MACRO romantic drama “Really love.

The film tells the story of an emerging black painter named Isaiah (Siriboe) living in newly gentrified Washington DC on the dawn of a booming career. He meets Stevie (Wong-Loi-Sing), a law student whose ambitions do not match her family’s vision for success. The two fall in love and Stevie becomes Isaiah’s muse. But soon, neglect causes problems, leaving the two to wonder if they have a future together.

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REALLY LOVE (MACRO)

Really Love screenwriter and native of DC Felicia Pride explained his inspiration for writing history.

“It was wanting to tell a love story that felt genuine,” she said. “One who felt lived, in terms of experience. The one who comes and goes. It’s linear, not linear. It is an open and complete circle. I also wanted to show complicated and beautiful black people in this love story. In love, in friends, in family, in community. And wanting to show DC as such an important place for so many black people. It has a cultural and artistic base and a rich historical landscape. Also because we haven’t seen a black love story in a while.

For director Angel Kristi Williams, showing the film in his hometown of Baltimore with a host of friends, family and Baltimore residents was magical.

“I’m inspired by a lot of our classic love stories, some very old ones too,” Williams said. “Seeing Kofi and Yootha on screen looking chocolate and dewy – with the audience I made the movie for – was magical. Being able to connect with them personally meant a lot.

The film also features Uzo Aduba, Naturi Naughton, Jade Eshete, Blair Underwood, Michael Ealy and Suzzanne Douglas, in his last on-screen role.

Really love“is streaming on Netflix.

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Kofi Siriboe and Yootha Wong-Loi-Sing in “Really Love”


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The work of the first internationally renowned African-American painter explored: NPR

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Photograph by Henry Ossawa Tanner in 1907.

Frederick Gutekunst (1831-1917) / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution


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Frederick Gutekunst (1831-1917) / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution

I just met Henry Ossawa Tanner. Nice tip, since he died in 1937. Tanner was the first African-American artist of international renown. His paintings are in many museums, but I have seen them countless times. Now, in preparing this column, I got to know a little about his life and his time (as well as new revelations about his artistic thinking) and I thought of making the introductions.

Absolutely sir. Born in Pittsburgh, 1859. Raised in Philadelphia. Expatriate death in Paris. “He immediately saw that he could do better in France,” explains Sue Canterbury, curator of the Dallas Museum of Art.

He had a hard time getting into the art classes he wanted – and finding teachers who would accept him. In France, the color of the skin mattered less. He told a magazine writer, “in Paris nobody looks at me curiously. I’m just Mr.[onsieur] Tanner, an American artist. No one knows or cares about the complexion of my ancestors. “

The French loved his work. In 1897, the government bought one of his pieces for the state collections. With this rare honor, his reputation soared. Museums began to buy tanners. In 1900, as massive reproductions of the portrait of Christ and books on his life circulated, curator Canterbury said: “Tanner was considered the foremost European painter of religious scenes.

Henry Ossawa Tanner, Christ and his mother studying the scriptures, vs. 1908, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art

Dallas Museum of Art


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Dallas Museum of Art

It’s a beautiful image, with what has been called “Tanner Blue” – a color that has become his signature. Tanner’s role models were his wife Jessie Olsson (Swedish American from San Francisco; she was studying opera when Tanner met her in Paris) and their son Jesse. Family influence is at the heart of Tanner’s religious works. Her father was a pastor in the African Methodist Episcopal Church. The family was highly educated, and Canterbury says their home was “a center of black cultural life” in Philadelphia.

Christ and his mother studying the scriptures is one of two Tanners on display at the Dallas Museum of Art through early January. Conservation work has been done on both, and x-rays and infrared photography revealed surprises and glimpses of the artist’s thought process.

X-ray of Christ and his mother study the scriptures showing the underlying abandoned composition.

Dallas Museum of Art


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Dallas Museum of Art

“Conservation never gets old,” says conservator Laura Hartman. “There is always an ‘aha!’ moment. “In this one, when the painting was rotated horizontally, the x-rays showed another composition underneath. Two figures draped in a landscape. Ah! No one had seen them before. Tanner ditched them and walked away. is turned to the Holy Family instead.

The other Tanner in Dallas (both paintings presented in collaboration with the Art Bridges Foundation) was done early in his career. Scholars call it a “genre” painting – a glimpse into ordinary everyday life.

Henry Ossawa Tanner, The grateful poor, 1894, oil on canvas, Bridges of art

Dallas Museum of Art


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Dallas Museum of Art


Henry Ossawa Tanner, The grateful poor, 1894, oil on canvas, Bridges of art

Dallas Museum of Art

Religion also plays a role in this play. The old man reaches for the heavens with his hands in prayer. His prayer of thanks is so intense. The boy is concentrating too, but I wonder if he isn’t fidgeting a bit. See how the bench he’s sitting on tilts forward?

Hartman’s findings here show Tanner working on composition.

Henry Ossawa Tanner, The grateful poor, 1894, oil on canvas, with drawn overlay

Dallas Museum of Art


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Dallas Museum of Art

He moved the plates and postures to showcase the old man’s hands. After conservator Hartman removed the blackened coat of varnish, she revealed Tanner’s use of many colors – vivid blues, oranges, layered, scraped, sanded and textured.

Detail (photomicrograph) showing several colors in a marbled paint stroke of The grateful poor

Dallas Museum of Art


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Dallas Museum of Art

At the age of 11, Henry Ossawa Tanner spotted a man painting in a park in Philadelphia. The boy decided he wanted to paint too. His parents gave him 15 cents, and he bought – his words – “dry colors and a few scruffy brushes.” Eventually he became well known and a source of inspiration. Working in his Parisian studio, he was a model for other painters.

Canterbury says that “any African-American artist who went to Europe had to make a pilgrimage to see Tanner”. They saw an artist succeed despite prejudices, who encouraged and helped them with advice, even money. Those first 15 cents ended up being a great investment.

Art Where You’re At is an informal series featuring online offerings at museums you may not be able to visit.


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