Home Blog Page 3

Writer and poet wins Lifetime Achievement Award

0

MOUNT DESERT – The Dorothea and Leo Rabkin Foundation is dedicated to recognizing and rewarding writers who make art accessible to the general public. The directors of the Rabkin Foundation announced that the foundation has awarded a lifetime achievement award of $ 50,000 to poet and art critic Carl Little of Mount Desert.

For over 30 years, Little has been a major cultural link between Maine and New York City, writing on the Maine art scene for national publications and on the wider art world for Maine magazines. .

Suzette McAvoy, recently retired director of the Center for Maine Contemporary Art in Rockland, describes Little as “a champion of art and artists in Maine and beyond.”

“His many books on art, written with enthusiasm and sensitivity, draw on his deep knowledge of art history and his active engagement with artists and the artistic community,” says McAvoy. “His work is and will remain an important contribution to the history of art in Maine and America.

Little began writing about art in 1980, the year he obtained a master’s degree in poetry from Columbia University. He first wrote reviews for Arts Magazine, then in 1986 became associate editor of Art in America. He continued to write for Art in America after moving to Maine in 1989, after being introduced to the coast and islands of Maine by his uncle, painter William Kienbusch.

In recent years, Little has been a regular contributor to Hyperallergic and Art New England and for 25 years he has written artist profiles and reporting for Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors.

In addition to art critics and journalism, Little has published 30 art books, including “Paintings of Maine”, “Paintings of New England”, “The Watercolors of John Singer Sargent”, “Edward Hopper’s New England” , “Winslow Homer and the Sea”, Eric Hopkins: Above and Beyond “,” Art of the Maine Islands “,” Art of Acadia “and” Art of Monhegan Island “.

Little is also the author of monographs on Joel Babb, Philip Barter, Jeffrey Becton, Beverly Hallam, Francis Hamabe, Dahlov Ipcar, William Irvine and Irene Hardwicke Olivieri. He won the first John N. Cole Prize for Nonfiction from the Maine Writers & Publishers Alliance in 2012. Little is also the editor of “Discovery: 50 Years of Craft Experience at Haystack Mountain School of Craft” and “Art of Katahdin” , a collaboration with his brother, the painter David Little.

As a poet, Little has published two collections, “3000 Dreams Explained” and “Ocean Drinker: New & Selected Poems”.

The Dorothea and Leo Rabkin Foundation, headquartered in Portland, presents annual awards to eight visual arts journalists from across the country. This is the third time that the foundation has awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award. Leo Rabkin was an artist who worked and exhibited in New York for 60 years. His wife, Dorothea, partnered with Leo to create a historic collection of American folk art and brut art. They lived in New York and had a large circle of friends, including artists, writers, and curators. Leo wanted the foundation to help art journalists who play a vital role in the art community nationwide.

The directors of the Dorothea and Leo Rabkin Foundation are: Edgar Allen Beem of Brunswick (artistic journalist, political columnist); Deborah Irmas from Los Angeles, California (writer, art historian, philanthropist), Nancy Karlins Thoman from New York (art historian, curator, journalist). The executive director of the foundation is Susan C. Larsen (art historian, curator).

For more information, contact Danielle Frye, executive assistant and gallery owner, at [email protected]


Source link

After losing the use of his dominant arm, painter changes life with CGI

0

NEYAGAWA, Osaka Prefecture – Toshio Katsuma, a painter, was devastated when he lost the ability to use his dominant left hand due to sudden illness 11 years ago.

He no longer knew how to draw. It was a blow, and he almost lost the will to live.

But seven years later, the artist fulfilled his long-held dream of hosting a solo exhibition through hard work and the help of a computer and a friend’s pet chat.

A CG illustration of a cat (Provided by Toshio Katsuma)

Katsuma, 70, has always been good at drawing since childhood.

When he was in high school, his sci-fi comic book became popular among his classmates, earning him the nickname “Manga”.

He decided to pursue a career in drawing after graduation, and then study at a professional painting school instead of a high school.

Katsuma made his professional debut as a manga artist at the age of 18 when his first work was published in the comic book anthology Weekly Shonen Magazine, which also published the hugely popular serial titles “The Star of the Giants “and” Ashita no Joe “(Tomorrow’s Joe).

Unfortunately, none of his manga works gained popularity, and his manga career ended after about three years.

Yet he relied on his talents as a painter to survive, working as an instructor at a vocational school and providing illustrations for advertisements and other services.

In December 2010, he felt his hands shake. He collapsed at his home in Osaka after working without sleeping to finish a drawing.

He had suffered a stroke.

When Katsuma came to himself, he felt numb along the left side of his body and couldn’t hold a brush with his dominant hand.

He was 59 at the time.

His doctor told him that he could no longer work as a painter.

But Katsuma refused to give up.

2020905-cat-2-L
An image of a cat drawn by Toshio Katsuma using a personal computer for the first time after suffering a stroke (Provided by Toshio Katsuma)

Thinking that he might be able to draw using a personal computer, he moved the mouse with his right hand and made a drawing. He continued even though he was not happy with the result.

Two years later, a friend asked Katsuma to draw her pet cat. It pleased her to see that she was delighted with the portrait he had created on his computer.

He posted the drawing on his Facebook page, and it instantly attracted hundreds of likes and gave him confidence in his skills.

Since then, Katsuma has uploaded her drawings every day.

His models are invariably stray cats. Having lost an important part of himself, he identifies with them as they roam the streets without being noticed by anyone.

His drawings caught the attention of an art dealer, who helped Katsuma organize a solo exhibition at a department store in Saitama Prefecture in September 2017. It was his first experience showing his works in a gallery. .

Some visitors shed tears as they remembered their dead animals.

“I always wanted to draw pictures that would be remembered because I had only drawn manga and other designs that would be thrown away after a short while,” Katsuma said.

It was as if a new path opened before him, he said.

He has since held solo exhibitions in department stores and bookstores in Tokyo, Fukuoka, Osaka and elsewhere across the country.

2020905-cat-4-L
An acrylic painting of a cat drawn by Toshio Katsuma with his non-dominant right hand (Provided by Toshio Katsuma)

Two years ago, when Katsuma was holding a paintbrush with his right hand, he was pleasantly surprised to find that he could draw as well with it as he once could with his dominant hand.

During a solo show in January at a department store in Osaka’s Minami district, Katsuma drew an acrylic painting of a cat with a brush for a live event.

“I want to organize personal exhibitions exclusively using my hand-drawn paintings in the years to come,” Katsuma said.

He said he is now determined to move beyond the skill level he had before he got sick.


Source link

First large-scale museum exhibition for avant-garde abstract painter Jacqueline Humphries

0

This fall, the Wexner Center for the Arts at Ohio State University will dedicate its galleries to the first large-scale museum exhibition of avant-garde abstract painter Jacqueline Humphries. On view from September 18 to January 2, 2022, jHΩ1 🙂 will showcase more than 30 paintings, including a new multi-panel installation, its largest to date, created in response to the centre’s iconic postmodern architecture.

“We are delighted to host this important exhibition, which comes at a key moment in the artist’s career. Jacqueline’s paintings are not only beautiful, but powerful large-scale creations that push the boundaries of abstract painting as we think we know it. Seeing this work in a playful fight with the architecture of the Wex will be an unforgettable experience for viewers, ”said Johanna Burton, Executive Director of the Wexner Center.

The exhibition is curated by guest curator Mark Godfrey, whose recent projects include Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power 1963-1983, critically acclaimed, and Laura Owens & Vincent van Gogh, which will open on 19 June at the Vincent van Foundation. Gogh Arles.

A fall exhibit opening will take place on Friday, September 17 and feature a conversation between Humphries and Godfrey. The opening celebration begins at 5 p.m.

On Monday October 4th, Godfrey will be back for “Where Does Art Lie?” The conference begins at 4 p.m.

On Wednesday, October 27, Humphries will join artist and writer Felix Bernstein for an event featuring a performative dialogue from the two, with an invitation for audience participation. The dialogue takes place at 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Jacqueline Humphries: jHΩ1 🙂 will take place from September 18, 2021 to January 2, 2022 at the Wexner Center for the Arts, 1871 N. High St. (at 15th Avenue) on the Ohio State University campus in Columbus.

The current gallery opening hours are 11:00 am to 4:00 pm Sunday, Tuesday to Wednesday and Friday to Saturday; and 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Thursday, but hours will be extended this fall before the exhibition opens. Admission is $ 9; $ 7 for seniors and Ohio State teachers and staff. Entrance to the gallery is free for Wexner Center members, students, veterans and serving military personnel, as well as visitors 18 and under, and free on Thursdays from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Admission is also free for all on Sundays, powered by the American Electric Power Foundation.


Source link

Rijuda, CA Creator, Singer, Painter Passes Away in Kolkata | Calcutta News

0
KOLKATA: Very few people lived and savored life like Buddhadeb Guha did. Author, singer, painter and CA were just four of his many facets, the larger image being of a tall man. On his last trip Monday, many described him as the king of his famous teenage story, “Baja Tora Raja Jae”.
Guha, who was 85, died of post-Covid complications in a hospital on Sunday evening. After a brief recovery from Covid, he was at home but started complaining of shortness of breath and kidney problems, which brought him back to hospital, where he died. “But not before saying goodbye,” said Bamacharan Mukhopadhyay, his friend for over 30 years who has edited several books on Guha.

He and dermatologist Kaushik Lahiri were Guha’s constant companions. Whether in McCluskieganj, Palamau, the Sunderbans or the jungles of North Bengal, vignettes of which can be found in Guha’s stories for children and adults, Mukhopadhyay and Lahiri followed him like a shadow.
“For the past few years, when his health and eyesight had confined him indoors and he couldn’t write, Dada dictated his stories,” Lahiri said. The creator of the very popular “Rijuda” and “Ribhu” was as skilled with a brush as his quill. “Sometimes I lose track of my words and see them turn into pictures, then the pen automatically turns into a brush,” Guha said at her home in Ballygunge, while accepting an invitation to the Times Lit Fest.
Guha was trained in Rabindrasangeet in Dakshini, where he met his wife, Ritu Guha, a Tagore music expert, who died before him. He also trained in classical music and old Kolkata toppa music with Ramkumar Chattopadhyay and Chandidas Mal. “Music was as close to his heart as writing and he was ready to sing, with or without asking. Once, while we were in a tea garden in Jalpaiguri, he disappeared. After almost an hour of searching, I found him in the line of coolies, chanting the toppa, ‘Kichhui to holo na’, to the garden workers. They did not understand a word but sat down in front of the majestic artist, ”said author Samaresh Majumdar. Similar stories were shared by writer Amar Mitra, who was also close to Guha.
Friends for 60 years, author Shirshendu Mukhopadhyay found Guha the most beautiful man when they were both 25 years old. I used to say you are miles ahead of us, ”he laughed, a tear escaping him. “Until he was absolutely confined to the house, he would come home every winter, asking my wife to prepare the marrow for him. She also passed away yesterday, ”he said.
Guha has entrusted Lahiri with a large collection of his letters and paintings and an anthology is in preparation. “He oversaw a lot of it and told me how he wanted the book to be. I’ll do my best to stick to the instructions. Now that he is not there physically, the instructions and suggestions he would constantly give me will ring louder, ”said Lahiri.
Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted: “The writings of Shri Buddhadeb Guha were multifaceted and showed great sensitivity to the environment. His works have been appreciated through the generations, especially among the young. His death is a great loss for the literary world. Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee tweeted: “Deeply saddened by the disappearance of Buddhadeb Guha, one of Bengal’s most famous authors. He leaves behind a huge void in Bengali literature.


Source link

Tribute to the writer Bulbul Chowdhury

0

Bulbul Chowdhury. Photo: Collected

“>



Bulbul Chowdhury. Photo: Collected

People from all walks of life paid their final tributes to Ekushey Padak’s award-winning writer Bulbul Chowdhury on the premises of Bangla Academy yesterday.

They placed wreaths of flowers on the casket and stood in silence to pray for his dead soul, while some said their farewells in tears.

For all the latest news, follow the Daily Star’s Google News channel.

The 73-year-old writer breathed his last around 6 p.m. Saturday at his residence in Bangla Bazar in the capital. He was suffering from cancer, his son R Rafi told the Daily Star.

His body was taken to the premises of the Bangla Academy around 11 a.m. yesterday for a final tribute after his first namaz-e-janaza took place at a local mosque in Bangla Bazar.

After his second namaz-e-janaza at the academy

local, he was buried in the cemetery of the intellectual martyrs of Mirpur.

Meanwhile, Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina expressed his deep shock and sadness over the writer’s death.

In a condolence message yesterday, the Prime Minister prayed for his eternal peace and expressed his deep sympathy to the bereaved family.

Bulbul Chowdhury was born on August 16, 1948 in Dakshinbag in Gazipur.

Besides the Ekushey Padak for his contribution to Bengali literature, he also received the Bangla Academy Literary Prize, Humayun Qadir Smriti Purashkar and Jasimuddin Smriti Purashkar, to name a few.

Tuka Kahini, Machher Raat, Aparup Bil Jhil Nodi, Tiyaser Lekhon, Jibaner Ankibunki, Atoler Kathakatha, Prachin Gitikar Golpo are some of his popular works of fiction.

Bulbul Chowdhury is survived by his wife and three sons.


Source link

Director Angel Kristi Williams and Co-Writer Felicia Pride Talk About ‘Really Love’

0

Blackfilm.com correspondent Ellen J. Wanjiru speaks with the director Angel Kristi Williams and co-author Felicia Pride on inspiration and their collaboration in ‘Really love‘. Watch the interview below!

SYNOPSIS:

Set against the backdrop of a gentrified Washington DC, Isaiah, an emerging black painter is about to burst or give up when he meets Stevie, an intriguing beauty with a big brain.

They fall in love with each other, hard. Stevie quickly becomes one of Isaiah’s biggest fans and artistic muse. Isaiah’s creativity flows with her in her life, but her work remains overlooked by curators and collectors, hurting her ego. When Isaiah finally convinces a renowned gallery owner to try his luck, he devotes himself to his work, neglecting Stevie. Isaiah’s debut solo show catapults him into new artistic echelons, but it doesn’t leave much room for Stevie. Reluctantly, she accepts a dream job in Chicago, breaking Isaiah’s heart.

A year goes by without communication, until Isaiah meets Stevie at her group show in Chicago. Sleepy feelings rise to the surface. When Stevie returns to the neighborhood at Isaiah’s invitation, her life looks better; the art world has baptized him its new “it boy”. But Isaiah’s life isn’t what he imagined and he’s forced to face the truth: can he give Stevie what he knows she deserves?

With: Kofi Siriboe, Yootha Wong-Loi-Sing, Uzo Aduba, Mack Wilds, Naturi Naughton, Suzzanne Douglas, Jade Eshete with Blair Underwood and Michael Ealy. Realized by Angel Kristi Williams.

Really love is funded and co-produced by MACRO. Now streaming on Netflix.

Kofi Siriboe & Yootha Wong-Loi-Sing



Source link

In memory of Frank Soos, former award-winning Alaska writer and professor of creative writing

0
Frank Soos (Photo courtesy of 49 writers.)

Former Alaska award-winning writer and professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Frank Soos, has passed away. Soos was on a solo bike ride in Maine last Wednesday when he suffered a fatal accident.

Frank Soos was born in 1950 and raised in the mining town of Pocahontas, Virginia. His parents had a market and this education taught Soos and his brother the value of hard work and community. Soos has never lost his regional accent or his self-defeating courtesy. While his literary interests originated in high school, they caught fire at Davidson College.

“Davidson sort of looked like that dream,” Soos said in 2019. “There were all these guys sitting under the trees reading books and talking. I thought, wow, if it’s college, I can do it.

At Davidson, Soos would meet his longtime friend and sometimes collaborator, art historian and painter Kesler Woodward. After college, Soos taught high school for a while and found out he liked it, but life as a writer beckoned him and he entered the Creative Writing Program at the University of L ‘Arkansas, where he earned an MFA. Soos said higher education was unexpectedly enlightening.

“It was a horrible program,” he said. “It was intentionally cruel, and I decided I would never participate in a program like this if I was a teacher.”

These lessons found expression when he joined the English department at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks in 1986. There he met poet Peggy Shumaker and together helped forge a creative writing program. which has attracted writers from across the country and trained a new generation of renowned Alaskan writers.

“We had graduate students coming to me and I was like ‘Here’s where you can compress,’” Shumaker said. “And then they would go to Frank and Frank would say, ‘Well, maybe this is a place you can do it longer. “And I’m sure we confused a lot of students at first, but believe it or not, it worked.

Shumaker said Soos was the most generous teacher she had ever met.

“You learn when you are a teacher that if you put demands on students, you will impose them on yourself,” Soos said in 2019. “So to turn it around, that means you sit at your desk and read a lot. articles and lots of comments to prepare for all of these conferences. This is teaching.

This commitment to hard work extended to her writing. Shumaker says that in addition to his elegantly crafted phrases and odd ear for dialogue, Soos continued to write no matter what.

“He worked for decades with very little recognition and then suddenly he had two pounds at a time,” she said. “And he was typically modest. But what he always did, in good times as in bad times, he just kept plugging in.

This tenacity saw Soos win the Flannery Connor Prize in 1998 and become the Alaska Laureate Writer in 2014. A posthumous collection of Soos stories is expected to be published in 2023.

While Soos has always claimed to be a loner, he has managed to form a series of creative collaborations – with Shumaker and the painter Woodward and more intimately with his wife and artist Margo Klass. He is also inextricably linked to the Fairbanks bike and ski clubs. Longtime friend and fellow Nordic skier, Susan Sugai said that while Soos does not compete in races like the 50K Sonot Kkaazoot, he does volunteer bibs or timing races.

“He knew times are important to people,” she said. “It’s not necessarily the people who win, it’s the people who participate and try to improve. He liked it.


Source link

In memory of Frank Soos, former award-winning Alaska writer and professor of creative writing

0

Frank Soos (Photo courtesy of 49 Writers via Frank Soos)

Former Alaska award-winning writer and University of Alaska Fairbanks professor Frank Soos died last Wednesday in a solo bicycle accident in Maine. He was 70 years old.

Listen to this story:

Soos was born in 1950 and raised in the mining town of Pocahontas, Virginia. His parents had a market and this education taught Soos and his brother the value of hard work and community. Soos has never lost his regional accent or his self-defeating courtesy. While his literary interests originated in high school, they caught fire at Davidson College.

“Davidson sort of looked like that dream,” Soos said in 2019. “There were all these guys sitting under the trees reading books and talking. I thought, wow, if it’s college, I can do it.

In Davidson, Soos would meet his longtime friend and sometimes collaborator, art historian and painter Kesler Woodward. After college Soos taught high school for a while and found out he liked it, but life as a writer beckoned him and he entered the Creative Writing Program at the University of L ‘Arkansas, where he earned an MFA. Soos said higher education was unexpectedly enlightening.

“It was a horrible program,” he said. “It was intentionally cruel, and I decided I would never participate in a program like this if I was a teacher.”

These lessons found expression when he joined the English department at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks in 1986. There he met poet Peggy Shumaker and together helped forge a creative writing program. which has attracted writers from across the country and trained a new generation of renowned Alaskan writers.

“We had graduate students coming to me and I was like, ‘Here’s where you can compress,’” Shumaker said. “And then they’d go to Frank and Frank would say, ‘Well, maybe this is a place you can do it longer. “And I’m sure we confused a lot of students at first, but believe it or not, it worked.

Shumaker said Soos was the most generous teacher she had ever met.

“You learn when you are a teacher that if you put demands on students, you will impose them on yourself,” Soos said in 2019. “So to turn the situation around it means you sit at your desk and read a lot. articles and commenting a lot to prepare for all of these conferences. This is teaching.

This commitment to hard work extended to her writing. Shumaker says that in addition to his elegantly crafted phrases and odd ear for dialogue, Soos continued to write no matter what.

“He worked for decades with very little recognition, and then suddenly he had two pounds at a time,” she said. “And he was typically modest. But what he always did, in good times and bad, he just kept plugging in.

This tenacity saw Soos win the Flannery Connor Prize in 1998 and become the Alaska Winning Writer in 2014. A posthumous collection of Soos stories is expected to be released in 2023.

While Soos has always claimed to be a loner, he has managed to form a series of creative collaborations – with Shumaker and the painter Woodward and more intimately with his wife and artist Margo Klass. He is also inextricably linked to the bike and ski clubs of Fairbanks. Longtime friend and fellow Nordic skier, Susan Sugai said that while Soos does not compete in races like the 50K Sonot Kkaazoot, he does volunteer bibs or timing races.

“He knew times are important to people,” she said. “It’s not necessarily the people who win, it’s the people who participate and try to improve. He liked it.

[Sign up for Alaska Public Media’s daily newsletter to get our top stories delivered to your inbox.]


Source link

How Home Depot made Jasmine Mans a better writer

0

Photos by Taylor Baldwin.

It is Disorganized, in which our favorite writers get to the bottom of their own craft. From favorite drinks for writing to whether or not you need to carry a notebook, we find out all the ways they beat writer’s block and do it. This week, we speak with Jasmine Mans on the occasion of her collection of poetry “Black girl, call home” which was released earlier this year. The work tackles topics such as black hair care, family bereavement and the tangled relationships between mothers and daughters. Below take a look at Mans’ writing process.

———

JULIANA UKIOMOGBE: Describe your ideal writing atmosphere. What gets you in the mood?

JASMINE MANS: An organized space, without distractions. White noise, ocean sounds or a John Coltrane playlist. These options allow me to navigate a sonic journey without being distracted by literal words. While writing, I hear no words other than those I conjure.

UKIOMOGBE: Do you eat or drink while you write? If so, what do you like to have?

MANS: I am a chronic and terribly insane coffee drinker. I can handle a filter coffee or an oat milk latte in every writing session, one or maybe even two. When I think of writing, I think of things that make me feel safe. The warmth of the coffee reminds me of home and, in return, comforts me. Really, I had no idea how important comfort was in my writing process until now.

UKIOMOGBE? Do you sometimes smoke while you are writing?

MANS: Smoking weed can have many different reactions during the creative process. Sometimes cannabis makes you nervous, anxious, and fuzzy. There are other times when cannabis relaxes this mind, allowing for peace. I will also say, even as the CEO of a company called Buy Weed From Women, that the best mind is a sober mind.. Art doesn’t depend on cannabis, but I wish everyone a healthy canna-art relationship.

UKIOMOGBE: Do you keep a notebook and / or diary?

MANS: I keep too much, that’s the problem. Now I have a Google document on my computer titled “Next” and I will try to write everything in this document, or transfer all my writing to this document. To be a “good” writer, routine and organization are essential. Having one place to refer to your work allows you to track your growth.

UKIOMOGBE: Do you prefer handwriting or typing?

MANS: I prefer to type because I can literally think faster. I type faster than I write. However, laptops offer no distractions, no open tabs, no pop-up windows, no apps. With a notebook, it’s just you and the page. The computer understands you, the page, and the global web lustfully waiting to distract you. It’s not sure !

UKIOMOGBE: What’s your favorite quote?

MANS: “You are your best asset. »Toni Morrison, Beloved.

UKIOMOGBE: Who do you always come back to when writing?

MANS: I will always turn to Toni Morrison and Amiri Baraka.

UKIOMOGBE: What’s your favorite book to reread?

MANS: I love re-reading Dr Suess Oh the places you’ll go! when I’m drunk, honestly.

UKIOMOGBE: Do you read while you are writing?

MANS: Yeah, I read stuff to educate myself and to find smart ways to spread my language on the page. This is what I’m most proud of, my constant reading of things, all random and necessary things.

UKIOMOGBE: Which writers inform your current work the most?

MANS: Quinta Brunson, Ocean Vuong, Toni Morrison, Clint Smith, James Baldwin, Alice Walker, Gwendolyn Brooks, Roxane Gay and many more.

UKIOMOGBE: How many drafts of a piece do you usually write?

MANS: Excellent question! I’ve had poems that went through 30-40 drafts. I’ve had poems that only needed two drafts before they were finished. Drafts all depend on the depth, length and emotion of the poem.

UKIOMOGBE: What would be the title of your memoirs?

MANS: Maybe she was a genius.

UKIOMOGBE: Who is your favorite screenwriter?

MANS: Shonda Rhimes. She said she treated her audience like they were smart, I respect that. We want to treat our audience like they’re stupid, like we writers don’t exist in the same realities they live in. I feel smarter and smarter watching the work of Shonda Rhimes. I would like to offer the same to my audience.

UKIOMOGBE: Do you see writing as a spiritual practice?

MANS: Sometimes it does. I think we should make whatever we love a spiritual and ritualistic practice. When something becomes ritual, it is honored, it is cemented into the routine of life. The things that are related to his mind are to be protected, honored and shared.

UKIOMOGBE: Which writers would you choose to dine with, alive or dead?

MANS: Toni Morrison, James Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, Eckhart Tolle and Tupac Shakur. I would love to talk to Tracy Chapman about “Fast Car”, I would love to talk to Toni Morrison about Sula.

UKIOMOGBE: What advice do you have for those who want to become better writers?

MANS: Don’t stop. You are what you do. Keep writing and sharing, and discover new ways to fall in love with the craft. In 2017, I spent a year painting my poetry on a 6 foot Home Depot canvas. I am not a painter, but I rediscovered my love for poetry through painting and playing. Play with your art, don’t make your art your servant.

UKIOMOGBE: What are the unconventional techniques that you defend?

MANS: Physical exercise prepares the mind for writing. I am a better writer when I run. I believe other art forms can enhance yours. When I search for depth, I look at painters, storytellers, musicians and ballerinas in their techniques, I see how their techniques can be applied to my form.

UKIOMOGBE: Can good writing save the world?

MANS: That’s why God told a group of men to write the Bible.


Source link

Oregon employee recovers benefits from energy drink explosion

0

In a case with a rather odd pattern of facts, an Oregon appeals court upheld a state Workers’ Compensation Board ruling that awarded benefits to a painter who suffered an injury to his body. eye when the energy drink he was about to drink exploded, causing the cap bottle to hit him in the eye [SAIF Corp. v. Chavez-Cordova (In re Chavez-Cordova), 314 Ore. App. 5, 2021 Ore. App. LEXIS 1132 (Aug. 18, 2021)]. Quoting and citing generously from Larson’s Workers’ Compensation Act, the court recognized that the damage did not result from a personal risk to the painter despite the fact that he brought the drink to work. The court observed that the employer did not provide drinks to the employees, demanded that they take paid breaks and that the risk to which the painter incurred was sufficiently related to the employment to say that it arose from that employment.

Background

Claimant worked for the employer at a new construction painter. He was required to remain on the site during the compulsory paid breaks. With no place to sit during his break, claimant sat in the cab of his employer’s truck. He sustained an eye injury when, while opening a bottle of energy drink, its contents exploded and the cork shot him in the eye. The Workers’ Compensation Board determined that the claimant’s injury was not the result of his employment and the claimant appealed.

Risk categories

Quoting Larson’s Workers’ Compensation Act, current § 4.01, et seq.., the Oregon Court of Appeals noted that risks are broadly classified into three forms:

  • Risks associated with employment
  • Personal risks
  • Neutral risks

In this case, it was not disputed that the cause of the claimant’s injury was not an employment hazard. The Board also rejected the employer’s contention that the claimant was injured due to a personal risk. The Commission found that the risk of the bottle cap striking the claimant in the eye was a neutral risk that was neither job related nor personal to claimant.

Imported danger?

The court rejected the employer’s argument that the risk of injury was personal to the claimant because he had brought the energy drink to work. The court said drink bottles are ubiquitous in the workplace; he was skeptical of treating them as inherently dangerous objects or personal instruments of risk [quoting Larson, § 9.03[5]].

In addition, the court noted, “[a]s Larson explains that even injuries caused by “imported” hazards can be compensable if there is a causal link with the job ” [Larson, § 9.03[3]]. The court continued:

Even assuming, as the employer contends, that the Applicant’s energy drink was an imported hazard, the consumption of the drink by the Applicant was related to employment. Since the employer required the claimant to take his paid breaks on the job site and not provide drinks, bringing his own beverage was a feature of the claimant’s job. The Board found that the employer had agreed and considered that the Claimant would drink beverages during his paid break, and this finding is supported by substantial evidence. Claimant’s injury occurred while performing this controlled act.

Based on the foregoing, the court concluded that the Board did not err in determining that Claimant’s employment placed him in a position of injury and that the injury therefore resulted from the employment.


Source link